September Hue-Man Experience Book Recommendations

 

2021 HUE-MAN EXPERIENCE SEPTEMBER BOOKLIST
 

The Hue-Man Experience at Tattered Cover covers everything from the classics to the newly released. This month’s reading list is centered around the drop of some of the most-anticipated reads of the year. Everything from Gabrielle Union to intimate stories from The Black Panther Party, we’ve got you covered.

 


 



HOW TO WRESTLE A GIRL
By Venita Blackburn

 

►    Venita Blackburn’s characters bully and suffer, spit and tease, mope and blame. They’re hyper aware of their bodies and fiercely observant, fending off the failures and advances of adults with indifferent ease. Stark and sharp, hilarious and ominous, these pieces are scabbed, bruised, and prone to scarring.

 A rising star, Blackburn is a trailblazing stylist, and in How to Wrestle a Girl she masterfully shakes loose a vision of girlhood that is raw, vulnerable, and never at ease.

 

 

 

 



MISFITS: A PERSONAL MANIFESTO 
by Micaela Coel 

 

►   When invited to deliver the MacTaggart Lecture at the Edinburgh International Television Festival, Michaela Coel touched a lot of people with her striking revelations about race, class and gender, but the person most significantly impacted was Coel herself. Building on her celebrated speech, Misfits immerses readers in her vision through powerful allegory and deeply personal anecdotes—from her coming of age in London public housing to her discovery of theater and her love for storytelling. And she tells of her reckoning with trauma and metamorphosis into a champion for herself, inclusivity, and radical honesty.

Misfits is a triumphant call for honesty, empathy and inclusion. Championing “misfits” everywhere, this timely, necessary book is a rousing coming-to-power manifesto dedicated to anyone who has ever worried about fitting in.

 

 

 



THREE GIRLS FROM BRONZEVILLE: A UNIQUELY AMERICAN
MEMOIR OF RACE, FATE, AND SISTERHOOD

by Dawn Turner

 

►  A “beautiful, tragic, and inspiring” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) memoir about three Black girls from the storied Bronzeville section of Chicago that offers a penetrating exploration of race, opportunity, friendship, sisterhood, and the powerful forces at work that allow some to flourish…and others to falter. In the vein of The Other Wes Moore and The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace, Three Girls from Bronzeville is a piercing memoir that chronicles Dawn’s attempt to find answers. It’s at once a celebration of sisterhood and friendship, a testimony to the unique struggles of Black women, and a tour-de-force about the complex interplay of race, class, and opportunity, and how those forces shape our lives and our capacity for resilience and redemption.


 

 

 



YOU GOT ANYTHING STRONGER? 
by Gabrielle Union

 

►   Picking up right where Union’s best-selling memoir, We’re Going To Need More Wine leaves off, this follow up is guaranteed to make you laugh as the stories dive deeper. Gabrielle Union writes, “This time, I need to be more vulnerable—not so much for me, but anyone who feels alone in what they’re going through. I have recently found true strength in that vulnerability, and I want to share that power with you here, through this book.”

 

 

 


 

 


UNBOUND: MY STORY OF LIBERATION AND THE BIRTH OF THE ME TOO MOVEMENT
by Tarana Burke

 

►    From the founder and activist behind one of the largest movements of the twenty-first century, the me too movement, Tarana Burke debuts a powerful memoir about her own journey to saying those two simple yet infinitely powerful words—me too—and how she brought empathy back to an entire generation in one of the largest cultural events in American history.




 

 

 

 


THE TREES
by Percival Everett

 

►   Percival Everett’s The Trees is a page-turner that opens with a series of brutal murders in the rural town of Money, Mississippi. When a pair of detectives from the Mississippi Bureau of Investigation arrive, they meet expected resistance from the local sheriff, his deputy, the coroner, and a string of racist White townsfolk. The murders present a puzzle, for at each crime scene there is a second dead body: that of a man who resembles Emmett Till.

In this bold, provocative book, Everett takes direct aim at racism and police violence, and does so in a fast-paced style that ensures the reader can’t look away. The Trees is an enormously powerful novel of lasting importance from an author with his finger on America’s pulse.

 

 



 


BELIEVING: OUR THIRTY-YEAR JOURNEY TO END GENDER VIOLENCE
By Anita Hill

 

►  From the woman who gave the landmark testimony against Clarence Thomas as a sexual menace, a new manifesto about the origins and course of gender violence in our society; a combination of memoir, personal accounts, law, and social analysis, and a powerful call to arms from one of our most prominent and poised survivors.

 

 

 

 

 


PLEASE DON'T SIT ON MY BED IN YOUR OUTSIDE CLOTHES
By Phoebe Robinson

 

►  Following Robinson’s Everything’s Trash, but It’s Okay and You Can’t Touch My Hair, her latest essay collection comes with takes on pop culture, her own life, and Black Lives Matter, among other topics.

“We’ve all been through a trying time, which is why I wrote something to make you laugh until you pee a little, feel until you want to rage a little, and think until you go back to laughing a little. That means telling you about the embarrassing accident that happened while quarantining with my boyfriend, the ways Black Lives Matter and performative allyship have taken center stage, my mom begrudgingly leaving her house so she could meet Michelle Obama, my decision to not have kids, and everything I’ve learned from running multiple companies (Pro tip: Always have a wig on standby for impromptu Zoom meetings).” -Phoebe Robinson

 

 


REVOLUTION IN OUR TIME: THE BLACK PANTHER PARTY'S PROMISE TO THE PEOPLE
By Kekla Magoon

►  With passion and precision, Kekla Magoon relays an essential account of the Black Panthers—as militant revolutionaries and as human rights advocates working to defend and protect their community.

In this comprehensive, inspiring, and all-too-relevant history of the Black Panther Party, Kekla Magoon introduces readers to the Panthers’ community activism, grounded in the concept of self-defense, which taught Black Americans how to protect and support themselves in a country that treated them like second-class citizens. For too long the Panthers’ story has been a footnote to the civil rights movement rather than what it was: a revolutionary socialist movement that drew thousands of members—mostly women—and became the target of one of the most sustained repression efforts ever made by the U.S. government against its own citizens.

 

 

 

 

 

View Recommendations from Past Months Here

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 12:45pm