Red Prophet: The Punishing Intellectualism of Vine Deloria, Jr. (Paperback)

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Red Prophet: The Punishing Intellectualism of Vine Deloria, Jr. (Paperback)

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In the face of looming, tumultuous global change, Red Prophet: The Punishing Intellectualism of Vine Deloria Jr. is a guide for those venturing into Vine's work in search of answers and solutions to Indigenous and non-Indigenous politics, ecology, and organization.

David E. Wilkins's insights, based on his personal relationship with Deloria, document the sacred life and legacy of "one of the most important religious thinkers of the twentieth century" (TIME). A must-read for any deep examination of Indigenous legal, religious, social, and philosophical tactics.
David E. Wilkins is a citizen of the Lumbee Nation and holds the McKnight Presidential Professorship in American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota. Wilkins is the author or editor of a number of books, including Dismembered: Native Disenrollment and the Battle for Human Rights. His articles have appeared in a range of social science, law, history, and ethnic studies journals.
Product Details ISBN: 9781682751657
ISBN-10: 1682751651
Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing
Publication Date: July 1st, 2018
Pages: 350
Language: English
"Perhaps we will all learn even more about the American Indian gift of prophecy and a sense of the sacredness of place as the drama at Standing Rock and elsewhere in America continues to unfold. Fortunately, we now have David Wilkins's Red Prophet: The Punishing Intellectualism of Vine Deloria Jr., to guide us on our journey to understanding the increasingly vital legacy of Vine Deloria Jr." —Bobby Bridger

"Every now and then a book comes along that reminds us that there is a vast history of the real work that Native writers have been doing in the 20th century that advances our knowledge of the “race” problem in the United States in important ways." —Elizabeth Cook-Lynn, Indian Z

"With the above in mind, one can practically hear Deloria dictating to Wilkins what ideas to highlight, which excerpts to quote, and how to organize this paean to Deloria’s legacy into something that wants to look like an intellectual biography but is more of a prolonged eulogy delivered by a devoted son to his spiritual father." —David Martínez, Wicazo Sa Review