Saratoga: Turning Point of America's Revolutionary War (Paperback)

Saratoga: Turning Point of America's Revolutionary War By Richard M. Ketchum Cover Image

Saratoga: Turning Point of America's Revolutionary War (Paperback)

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Historian Richard M. Ketchum's Saratoga vividly details the turning point in America's Revolutionary War.

In the summer of 1777 (twelve months after the Declaration of Independence) the British launched an invasion from Canada under General John Burgoyne. It was the campaign that was supposed to the rebellion, but it resulted in a series of battles that changed America's history and that of the world. Stirring narrative history, skillfully told through the perspective of those who fought in the campaign, Saratoga brings to life as never before the inspiring story of Americans who did their utmost in what seemed a lost cause, achieving what proved to be the crucial victory of the Revolution.

A New York Times Notable Book, 1997
Winner of the Fraunces Tavern Museum Award, 1997

Richard M. Ketchum (1922-2012) is the author of the Revolutionary War classics Decisive Day: The Battle of Bunker Hill; The Winter Soldiers: The Battles for Trenton and Princeton; the award-winning New York Times Notable Book Saratoga: Turning Point of America's Revolutionary War; and, most recently, Divided Loyalties: How the American Revolution Came to New York. He lived in Vermont.

Product Details ISBN: 9780805061239
ISBN-10: 0805061231
Publisher: Holt Paperbacks
Publication Date: May 15th, 1999
Pages: 576
Language: English

“This is superbly researched, full-scale narrative history at its best.” —David McCullough

“More than a brilliant, gripping account of one of history's most important battles; it is a vivid, needed reminder of how hard-fought, gritty, sweat-soaked, god-awful, heroic, and all-important was the American War. Like Shelby Foote unfolding the drama of the Civil War, Richard M. Ketchum writes of the Revolution as if he had been there . . . No novelist could create characters more memorable than the protagonists on both the American and British sides . . . This is superbly researched, full-scale narrative history at its best.” —David McCullough, author of John Adams